The McLean-Harvard First-Episode Mania Study: prediction of recovery and first recurrence.

@article{Tohen2003TheMF,
  title={The McLean-Harvard First-Episode Mania Study: prediction of recovery and first recurrence.},
  author={Mauricio Tohen and Carlos A. Zarate and John Hennen and Hari-Mandir Kaur Khalsa and Stephen M. Strakowski and Priscilla Gebre-Medhin and Paola Salvatore and Ross J. Baldessarini},
  journal={The American journal of psychiatry},
  year={2003},
  volume={160 12},
  pages={
          2099-107
        }
}
OBJECTIVE Since improved prediction of illness course early in bipolar disorder is required to guide treatment planning, the authors evaluated recovery, first recurrence, and new illness onset following first hospitalization for mania. METHOD Bipolar disorder patients (N=166) were followed 2-4 years after their first hospitalization for a manic or mixed episode to assess timing and predictors of outcomes. Three aspects of recovery were measured: syndromal (DSM-IV criteria for disorder no… 
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  • Medicine, Psychology
    Primary care companion to the Journal of clinical psychiatry
  • 2008
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