The Many Panics of 1837: People, Politics, and the Creation of a Transatlantic Financial Crisis by Jessica M. Lepler (review)

@article{Damiano2016TheMP,
  title={The Many Panics of 1837: People, Politics, and the Creation of a Transatlantic Financial Crisis by Jessica M. Lepler (review)},
  author={Sara T. Damiano},
  journal={Journal of the Early Republic},
  year={2016},
  volume={36},
  pages={420 - 422}
}
When used in 1830s America, ‘‘panic’’ often had a different and narrower meaning than it does today. Whereas ‘‘panic’’ now broadly connotes a sudden and frenetic state of fear, antebellum men and women understood panics as financial crises arising from specifically political causes. When labeling the events of 1837 as a panic, then, American writers and politicians obscured certain causes of financial turmoil and privileged others. They framed their nation’s economic woes in partisan terms… 
2 Citations
Preliminary and Incomplete Draft – Comments Welcome Andrew Jackson’s Bank War and the Panic of 1837: New Evidence
The role of Andrew Jackson’s Bank War in the Panic of 1837 has been the source of politically charged debate over most of the 180 years since the crisis occurred. We study the Panic of 1837 using
Preliminary and Incomplete Draft – Comments Welcome Andrew Jackson’s Bank War and the Panic of 1837
The role of Andrew Jackson’s Bank War in the Panic of 1837 has been the source of politically charged debate over most of the 180 years since the crisis occurred. We study the Panic of 1837 using

References

SHOWING 1-2 OF 2 REFERENCES
Toward a History of Cultural Economy
Republic of Debtors: Bankruptcy in the Age of American Independence