The Making and Remaking of a Labor Historian: Interview with James R. Barrett

@article{Mapes2016TheMA,
  title={The Making and Remaking of a Labor Historian: Interview with James R. Barrett},
  author={Kathleen Mapes and Randi Storch},
  journal={Labor: Studies in Working-Class History of the Americas},
  year={2016},
  volume={13},
  pages={63 - 79}
}
  • K. Mapes, Randi Storch
  • Published 23 April 2016
  • History
  • Labor: Studies in Working-Class History of the Americas
Abstract: On the eve of his 2014 retirement from the University of Illinois, a group of James R. Barrett’s former students gathered to interview him at his home in Champaign, Illinois. Jim’s career illuminates the trajectory of the field of labor and working-class history. The interview’s questions and Barrett’s responses document his contribution to the field and suggest new directions that may lie ahead. 

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