The Maintenance of Sex, Clonal Dynamics, and Host‐Parasite Coevolution in a Mixed Population of Sexual and Asexual Snails

@article{Jokela2009TheMO,
  title={The Maintenance of Sex, Clonal Dynamics, and Host‐Parasite Coevolution in a Mixed Population of Sexual and Asexual Snails},
  author={Jukka Jokela and Mark F. Dybdahl and Curtis M. Lively},
  journal={The American Naturalist},
  year={2009},
  volume={174},
  pages={S43 - S53}
}
Sexual populations should be vulnerable to invasion and replacement by ecologically similar asexual females because asexual lineages have higher per capita growth rates. However, as asexual genotypes become common, they may also become disproportionately infected by parasites. The Red Queen hypothesis postulates that high infection rates in the common asexual clones could periodically favor the genetically diverse sexual individuals and promote the short‐term coexistence of sexual and asexual… 
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