The Madness at Deolali

@article{Martin2006TheMA,
  title={The Madness at Deolali},
  author={N. Martin},
  journal={Journal of the Royal Army Medical Corps},
  year={2006},
  volume={152},
  pages={94 - 95}
}
  • N. Martin
  • Published 1 June 2006
  • History, Medicine
  • Journal of the Royal Army Medical Corps
The slang word 'doolally' or 'doolali' is used to describe someone who is 'out of one's mind' or 'crazy'. It is a derivation of 'doolali-tap' and originates from the latter part of the nineteenth century. The first part of this phrase is derived from the name of a small military town in the Indian state of Maharashtra called Deolali. The second part is a Hindustani word for fever, often ascribed to malaria, although in Sanskrit, 'tapa' means simply heat or torment. Taken literally, it is best… Expand
2 Citations

Topics from this paper

Imperial Outposts and the War Beyond: Singapore, Hong Kong and the British Empire’s Land Force Contribution to the Korean War
ABSTRACT Histories of the British Empire’s strategic outposts in the Far East have traditionally focused on their traumatic loss to the Japanese adversary during the Second World War. Only in theExpand
Photographs, railways, partition : domiciled Europeans in the later Raj
................................................................................................................................... xi ‘Chapter 1 – Introduction Expand

References

SHOWING 1-8 OF 8 REFERENCES
Doolali-tap
TLDR
a flat, featureless and plain, deserted dust bowl known as Deolali just one hundred miles North East of Bombay, where a weak minded chap’s mind snapped in the heat and the climate may well have been contributory to the condition. Expand
Tales from the Raj
What is Empire? What is not? Where is it? Where is it not? The most general backand- forth questions to begin. We could start by asking whether there is now anything outside the Empire of capital.Expand
Doolali-tap. Hist Psy- chiatry
  • 1994
Plain Tales from the Raj
Operations in Burma and North-East India
  • to 22nd June,
  • 1943
Old Soldier Sahib
  • Naval & Military Press Ltd, 2003 reprint (originally published Faber & Faber Ltd,
  • 1936