The Machiavellian Moment: Florentine Political Thought and the Atlantic Republican Tradition . By Pocock J. G. A.. (Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1975. Pp. 602. $22.50, cloth; $11.50, paper.)

@article{Mansfield1977TheMM,
  title={The Machiavellian Moment: Florentine Political Thought and the Atlantic Republican Tradition . By Pocock J. G. A.. (Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1975. Pp. 602. \$22.50, cloth; \$11.50, paper.)},
  author={Harvey Claflin Mansfield},
  journal={American Political Science Review},
  year={1977},
  volume={71},
  pages={1151-1152}
}
  • H. Mansfield
  • Published 1 September 1977
  • Philosophy, Sociology, History
  • American Political Science Review
"The Machiavellian Moment" is a classic study of the consequences for modern historical and social consciousness of the ideal of the classical republic revived by Machiavelli and other thinkers of Renaissance Italy. J.G.A. Pocock suggests that Machiavelli's prime emphasis was on the moment in which the republic confronts the problem of its own instability in time, and which he calls the "Machiavellian moment."After examining this problem in the thought of Machiavelli, Guicciardini, and… 

Machiavelli’s Summary of the Affairs of the City of Lucca: Venice as buon governo

In recent years, Niccolò Machiavelli’s historical and political writings from the 1520s have attracted increased attention. Students of Machiavelli coming from a wide range of interpretive approaches

On Their Tiptoes: Political Time and Newspapers during the Advent of the Radicalized French Revolution, circa 1792–1793

In his 1937 magnum opus, The Historical Novel, Hungarian literary critic Georg Lukacs suggested that new ideas about history - and implicitly, about time itself- laid the foundation for the

Postcolonial Republicanism and the Revival of a Paradigm

Abstract:Why did republicanism enjoy a revival in interest in the sixties and seventies and a “rediscovery” in the history of Western political thought? Over the twentieth century, many new states

American Machiavelli: Alexander Hamilton and the Origins of U.S. Foreign Policy, and: The Many Faces of Alexander Hamilton: The Life and Legacy of America's Most Elusive Founding Father (review)

American Machiavelli: Alexander Hamilton and the Origins of U.S. Foreign Policy. By John Lamberton Harper. (Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 2004. Pp. xii, 347. Illustrations, Cloth,

The Renaissance Critique of Hierarchy

One of this book’s tasks is to unsettle the Westphalia narrative of International Relations that identifies the Peace of Westphalia as the symbolic moment when medieval international relations gave

Renegotiating the empire, forging the nation(-state): the Bohemian/Czechoslovakian case through the political–economic thought of Thomas G. Masaryk and Karel Kramář, c. 1890–1920s

This article explores the dilemma of the small Bohemian Lands/Czechoslovak nation(-state) in staying “in” or “out” of the larger Habsburg supranational entity in the late nineteenth and the early

J. G. A. Pocock's republicanism and political theory: A critique and reinterpretation

A growing sense of the exhaustion of both liberalism and Marxism has fueled a revival of interest in civic republicanism among historians, political theorists, and social commentators. This turn is

"Marxism" and the Politics of History: Reflections on the Work of Eugene D. Genovese

The title of this essay should be “Historiography ‘R’ Us.” Three years ago, Lloyd Gardner urged me to participate in a roundtable discussion of William Appleman Williams at the Organization of

“Lockeian liberalism” and “classical republicanism”: the formation, function and failure of the categories

  • J. Clark
  • History
    Intellectual History Review
  • 2023
ABSTRACT The contest between “Lockeian liberalism” and “classical republicanism” as explanatory frameworks for the intellectual history of the American Revolution, and therefore of the present-day
...

References

SHOWING 1-2 OF 2 REFERENCES

I. History and Ideology in the English Revolution

Ideological arguments are commonly sustained by an appeal to the past, an appeal either to see precedents in history for new claims being advanced, or to see history itself as a development towards