The Lower City of Jerusalem on the Eve of Its Destruction, 70 c.e.: A View From Hanyon Givati

@article{BenAmi2011TheLC,
  title={The Lower City of Jerusalem on the Eve of Its Destruction, 70 c.e.: A View From Hanyon Givati},
  author={Doron Ben-Ami and Yana Tchekhanovets},
  journal={Bulletin of the American Schools of Oriental Research},
  year={2011},
  volume={364},
  pages={61 - 85}
}
This article deals with an architectural complex dating to the Early Roman period recently unearthed in Jerusalem. The complex, which consists of a large edifice and a purification annex, featured solid dates that mark both its phase of foundation as well as its demise. Accordingly, its construction is dated to the first century c.e.; the scores of coins found buried in the destruction layer inside the building date its end to the time of the First Jewish Revolt in the year 70 c.e. This… 

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