The Liverpool Care Pathway for cancer patients dying in hospital medical wards: A before–after cluster phase II trial of outcomes reported by family members

@article{Costantini2014TheLC,
  title={The Liverpool Care Pathway for cancer patients dying in hospital medical wards: A before–after cluster phase II trial of outcomes reported by family members},
  author={Massimo Costantini and Fabio Pellegrini and Silvia Di Leo and Monica Beccaro and C Rossi and Guia Flego and Vittoria Romoli and Michela Giannotti and Paola Morone and Giovanni Ivaldi and Laura Cavallo and Flavio Fusco and Irene J. Higginson},
  journal={Palliative Medicine},
  year={2014},
  volume={28},
  pages={10 - 17}
}
Background: Hospital is the most common place of cancer death but concerns regarding the quality of end-of-life care remain. Aim: Preliminary assessment of the effectiveness of the Liverpool Care Pathway on the quality of end-of-life care provided to adult cancer patients during their last week of life in hospital. Design: Uncontrolled before–after intervention cluster trial. Settings/participants: The trial was performed within four hospital wards participating in the pilot implementation of… 

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