The Link between Social Cognition and Self-referential Thought in the Medial Prefrontal Cortex

@article{Mitchell2005TheLB,
  title={The Link between Social Cognition and Self-referential Thought in the Medial Prefrontal Cortex},
  author={Jason P. Mitchell and Mahzarin R. Banaji and C. Neil Macrae},
  journal={Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience},
  year={2005},
  volume={17},
  pages={1306-1315}
}
The medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) has been implicated in seemingly disparate cognitive functions, such as understanding the minds of other people and processing information about the self. This functional overlap would be expected if humans use their own experiences to infer the mental states of others, a basic postulate of simulation theory. Neural activity was measured while participants attended to either the mental or physical aspects of a series of other people. To permit a test of… 
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    Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
  • 2009
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