The Library of Congress in 1892: Ainsworth Spofford, Houghton, Mifflin and Company, and Uncle Tom's Cabin

@article{Winship2010TheLO,
  title={The Library of Congress in 1892: Ainsworth Spofford, Houghton, Mifflin and Company, and Uncle Tom's Cabin},
  author={Michael P. Winship},
  journal={Libraries \& the Cultural Record},
  year={2010},
  volume={45},
  pages={85 - 91}
}
  • M. Winship
  • Published 27 January 2010
  • History
  • Libraries & the Cultural Record
On Wednesday, March 23, 1892, A. S. Wheeler, a clerk employed by the Boston publishing firm Houghton, Mifflin and Company, visited the Library of Congress at its location in the dome of the U.S. Capitol. He was there on secret business. Upon completing his consultations at the Library, Wheeler retired to his hotel, the Riggs House, and penned a thirteen-page letter (see below) to his employer in which he gave "full particulars" of his investigations.1 It provides an interesting and colorful… 
2 Citations

The Literature of American Library History, 2010–2011

As historians of libraries and librarianship, we face the constant challenge of understanding the people and actions of another era, of another time, and perhaps even of another culture that has

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