The Liberal and Labour Parties in North-East Politics 1900-14: The Struggle for Supremacy

@article{Purdue1981TheLA,
  title={The Liberal and Labour Parties in North-East Politics 1900-14: The Struggle for Supremacy},
  author={A. W. Purdue},
  journal={International Review of Social History},
  year={1981},
  volume={26},
  pages={1 - 24}
}
  • A. Purdue
  • Published 1 April 1981
  • History
  • International Review of Social History
The related developments of the rise of the Labour Party and the decline of the Liberal Party have been subjected to considerable scrutiny by historians of modern Britain. Their work has, however, had the effect of stimulating new controversies rather than of establishing a consensus view as to the reasons for this fundamental change in British political life. 
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