The Legacy of Community Organizing: Lugenia Burns Hope and the Neighborhood Union

@article{Rouse1984TheLO,
  title={The Legacy of Community Organizing: Lugenia Burns Hope and the Neighborhood Union},
  author={J. Rouse},
  journal={The Journal of Negro History},
  year={1984},
  volume={69},
  pages={114 - 133}
}
  • J. Rouse
  • Published 1984
  • Sociology
  • The Journal of Negro History
The history of black women's social activism extends back to the early nineteenth century when they organized and participated in literary societies and benevolent organizations.1 Following the Civil War, black women joined with white women and others in organizing various social-action leagues to protect the rights of the recently freed slaves. As the Reconstruction era came to an end, however, white and black women differed on the urgency of the right to vote based on sex as contrasted with… Expand
5 Citations

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