• Corpus ID: 199290311

The Late Emerging Consensus Among American Economists on Antitrust Laws in the Second New Deal

@inproceedings{Kirat2019TheLE,
  title={The Late Emerging Consensus Among American Economists on Antitrust Laws in the Second New Deal},
  author={Thierry Kirat and Fr{\'e}d{\'e}ric Marty},
  year={2019}
}
This paper presents the late convergence process from US economists that led them to support a strong antitrust enforcement in the late thirties despite their long standing distrust toward this legislation. The 1945 Alcoa decision crafted by Judge Hand embodied the results of this convergence. The purpose of antitrust law enforcement does not consist in promoting economic efficiency, as today’s more economic approach advocates, but in searching for a reasonable compromise aiming at preventing… 
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