The Largest Known Bear, Arctotherium angustidens, from the Early Pleistocene Pampean Region of Argentina: With a Discussion of Size and Diet Trends in Bears

@inproceedings{Soibelzon2011TheLK,
  title={The Largest Known Bear, Arctotherium angustidens, from the Early Pleistocene Pampean Region of Argentina: With a Discussion of Size and Diet Trends in Bears},
  author={Leopoldo Soibelzon and Blaine W. Schubert},
  booktitle={Journal of Paleontology},
  year={2011}
}
Abstract The South American giant short-faced bear (Arctotherium angustidens Gervais and Ameghino, 1880) is one of five described Arctotherium species endemic to South America and it is known for being the earliest, largest, and most carnivorous member of the genus. Here we report an extraordinarily large A. angustidens individual exhumed from Ensenadan sediments (early to middle Pleistocene) at Buenos Aires Province, Argentina. Based on overall size, degree of epiphyseal fusion, and… Expand
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