The Lady Tasting Tea: How Statistics Revolutionized Science in the Twentieth Century

@article{Potter2001TheLT,
  title={The Lady Tasting Tea: How Statistics Revolutionized Science in the Twentieth Century},
  author={John D. Potter},
  journal={Nature Medicine},
  year={2001},
  volume={7},
  pages={885-886}
}
  • J. Potter
  • Published 1 August 2001
  • Art
  • Nature Medicine
Reading a book about the most famous medical disputes in history teaches you two things: first, when time traveling, don’t go back to the 16th century to get that arterial wound fixed up. Second, despite mountains of common sense to the contrary, aliens have already landed on earth. The word aliens isn’t written anywhere in Hellman’s book, but if the past is any indication, and it usually is, some seemingly outlandish theory shunned by the present scientific community will be proven… Expand
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