The Keystone-Species Concept in Ecology and ConservationManagement and policy must explicitly consider the complexity of interactions in natural systems

@article{Mills1993TheKC,
  title={The Keystone-Species Concept in Ecology and ConservationManagement and policy must explicitly consider the complexity of interactions in natural systems},
  author={L. Mills and M. Soul{\'e} and D. Doak},
  journal={BioScience},
  year={1993},
  volume={43},
  pages={219-224}
}
  • L. Mills, M. Soulé, D. Doak
  • Published 1993
  • Biology
  • BioScience
  • 1Will the extinction of a single species in a community cause the loss of many others? Can we identify a set of species that are so important in determining the ecological functioning of a community that they warrant special conservation efforts? The answer to these questions hinges on the existence of a limited number of species whose loss would precipitate many further extinctions; these species have often been labeled keystone species. The term keystone species has enjoyed an enduring… CONTINUE READING

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