The Kelp Highway Hypothesis: Marine Ecology, the Coastal Migration Theory, and the Peopling of the Americas

@article{Erlandson2007TheKH,
  title={The Kelp Highway Hypothesis: Marine Ecology, the Coastal Migration Theory, and the Peopling of the Americas},
  author={J. Erlandson and M. Graham and B. Bourque and D. Corbett and J. Estes and R. Steneck},
  journal={The Journal of Island and Coastal Archaeology},
  year={2007},
  volume={2},
  pages={161 - 174}
}
  • J. Erlandson, M. Graham, +3 authors R. Steneck
  • Published 2007
  • Geography
  • The Journal of Island and Coastal Archaeology
  • ABSTRACT In this article, a collaborative effort between archaeologists and marine ecologists, we discuss the role kelp forest ecosystems may have played in facilitating the movement of maritime peoples from Asia to the Americas near the end of the Pleistocene. Growing in cool nearshore waters along rocky coastlines, kelp forests offer some of the most productive habitats on earth, with high primary productivity, magnified secondary productivity, and three-dimensional habitat supporting a… CONTINUE READING
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