The Kantian Peace: The Pacific Benefits of Democracy, Interdependence, and International Organizations, 1885–1992

@article{Oneal1999TheKP,
  title={The Kantian Peace: The Pacific Benefits of Democracy, Interdependence, and International Organizations, 1885–1992},
  author={John R. O'neal and Bruce M. Russett},
  journal={World Politics},
  year={1999},
  volume={52},
  pages={1 - 37}
}
The authors test Kantian and realist theories of interstate conflict using data extending over more than a century, treating those theories as complementary rather than competing. As the classical liberals believed, democracy, economic interdependence, and international organizations have strong and statistically significant effects on reducing the probability that states will be involved in militarized disputes. Moreover, the benefits are not limited to the cold war era. Some realist… 

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