The Jupiter System Through the Eyes of Voyager 1

@article{Smith1979TheJS,
  title={The Jupiter System Through the Eyes of Voyager 1},
  author={B. A. Smith and Laurence A. Soderblom and Torrence V. Johnson and Andrew P. Ingersoll and S. A. Collins and Eugene Merle Shoemaker and Garry E. Hunt and Harold Masursky and Michael H. Carr and Merton E. Davies and Allan F. Cook and Joseph M. Boyce and G. Edward Danielson and Tobias C. Owen and Carl E. Sagan and Reta Beebe and Joseph Frank Veverka and Robert Strom and John F. McCauley and David R. Morrison and Geoffrey A. Briggs and Verner E. Suomi},
  journal={Science},
  year={1979},
  volume={204},
  pages={951 - 972}
}
The cameras aboard Voyager 1 have provided a closeup view of the Jupiter system, revealing heretofore unknown characteristics and phenomena associated with the planet's atmosphere and the surfaces of its five major satellites. On Jupiter itself, atmospheric motions—the interaction of cloud systems—display complex vorticity. On its dark side, lightning and auroras are observed. A ring was discovered surrounding Jupiter. The satellite surfaces display dramatic differences including extensive… Expand

Topics from this paper

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The observed resonance scattering of solar hydrogen Lyman α by the atmosphere of Jupiter and the solar occultation experiment suggest a hot thermosphere (≥ 1000 K) wvith a large atomic hydrogen abundance. Expand
Jupiter's Cloud Distribution Between the Voyager 1 and 2 Encounters: Results from 5-Micrometer Imaging
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Observations from the Palomar 5-meter telescope and the new 3-meter NASA Infrared Telescope Facility at Mauna Kea suggest global patterns of clouding over of some Jovian belts and clearing of others. Expand
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Findings on Jupiter's zonal winds, convective storms, low-latitude upper troposphere, polar stratosphere, and northern aurora are reported, including previously unseen emissions arising from Io and Europa in eclipse, and a giant volcanic plume over Io's north pole are described. Expand
The Rings of Jupiter
The jovian ring was discovered as the result of a concerted search by the Voyager 1 cameras as the spacecraft passed Jupiter on March 4, 1979 (Smith et al., 1979b). Voyager’s wideand narrow-angleExpand
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