The Jihad of 1831-1832: The Misunderstood Baptist Rebellion in Jamaica

@article{Afroz2001TheJO,
  title={The Jihad of 1831-1832: The Misunderstood Baptist Rebellion in Jamaica},
  author={Sultana Afroz},
  journal={Journal of Muslim Minority Affairs},
  year={2001},
  volume={21},
  pages={227 - 243}
}
  • Sultana Afroz
  • Published 2001
  • Sociology
  • Journal of Muslim Minority Affairs
  • Contemporaneous to the autonomous Muslim Maroon ummah, hundreds of thousands of Mu’minun (the Believers of the Islamic faith) of African descent worked as slaves on the plantations in Jamaica. Remarkable intelligence, eloquence in speech, cultural self-conŽ dence, calm and discipline characterized these subdued and obedient African Muslim slaves as they toiled in various capacities on the estates. Yet, beneath this calmness and obedience was their determination to establish the Truth, which is… CONTINUE READING
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    References

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