Corpus ID: 148185400

The Jewish Prohibition Against Wastefulness: The Evolution of an Environmental Ethic

@inproceedings{Yoreh2014TheJP,
  title={The Jewish Prohibition Against Wastefulness: The Evolution of an Environmental Ethic},
  author={Tanhum Yoreh},
  year={2014}
}

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