The Jesus Tomb Controversy: An Overview

@article{Meyers2006TheJT,
  title={The Jesus Tomb Controversy: An Overview},
  author={Eric M. Meyers},
  journal={Near Eastern Archaeology},
  year={2006},
  volume={69},
  pages={116 - 118}
}
  • E. Meyers
  • Published 1 September 2006
  • History
  • Near Eastern Archaeology
the Albright Institute in Jerusalem; Andrey Feuerverger, professor of Statistics and Mathematics from the University of Toronto; Professor James Charlesworth from Princeton Theological Semi nary; and Dr. Charles Pellegrino, co-author with Jacobovici of the book, The Jesus Family Tomb, and forensic archaeologist. The book, published by HarperCollins, came out the same day. Most of these individuals claimed that the excavation of a tomb in 1980 in a southern suburb of Jerusalem known as East Tal… 

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