The Investigational Anticonvulsant Lacosamide Selectively Enhances Slow Inactivation of Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels

@article{Errington2008TheIA,
  title={The Investigational Anticonvulsant Lacosamide Selectively Enhances Slow Inactivation of Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels},
  author={Adam C. Errington and Thomas St{\"o}hr and Cara Heers and George Lees},
  journal={Molecular Pharmacology},
  year={2008},
  volume={73},
  pages={157 - 169}
}
We hypothesized that lacosamide modulates voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) at clinical concentrations (32-100 μM). Lacosamide reduced spiking evoked in cultured rat cortical neurons by 30-s depolarizing ramps but not by 1-s ramps. Carbamazepine and phenytoin reduced spike-firing induced by both ramps. Lacosamide inhibited sustained repetitive firing during a 10-s burst but not within the first second. Tetrodotoxin-sensitive VGSC currents in N1E-115 cells were reduced by 100 μM lacosamide… 

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