The International Whaling Commission and the Elusive Great White Whale of Preservationism

@article{Nagtzaam2009TheIW,
  title={The International Whaling Commission and the Elusive Great White Whale of Preservationism},
  author={Gerry Nagtzaam},
  journal={Environmental Economics eJournal},
  year={2009}
}
  • Gerry Nagtzaam
  • Published 28 December 2009
  • History
  • Environmental Economics eJournal
This article explores the attempts by international states and organizations to create a global legal whaling regime and examines its underlying competing environmental norms of exploitation, conservation and preservation. It outlines a history of whaling exploitation over the centuries and tracks the development of early whaling regimes, as well as examines the development of the International Whaling Commission and treaty. Legro's test of the robustness of a norm is applied to the whaling… 

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