The Institute of Social Economics: A Neglected Network in New York's Progressive Community

@article{Leccese2020TheIO,
  title={The Institute of Social Economics: A Neglected Network in New York's Progressive Community},
  author={Stephen Leccese},
  journal={New York History},
  year={2020},
  volume={101},
  pages={276 - 296}
}
“The School of Social Economics,” declared the New York Times in 1893, “while only in the third year of its existence, promises to be one of the successful educational institutions of the day.”1 This school, the Institute of Social Economics, was indeed on its way to prominence. The Institute’s president, economist and former labor activist George Gunton, was building his school into a central link in New York City’s economic reform network, leading to a position of considerable prestige and… Expand

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