The Insignificance of the Liberal Peace

@article{Spiro1994TheIO,
  title={The Insignificance of the Liberal Peace},
  author={David E. Spiro},
  journal={International Security},
  year={1994},
  volume={19},
  pages={50 - 86}
}
  • David E. Spiro
  • Published 23 January 1994
  • Political Science
  • International Security
This article challenges "The Liberal Peace" described in work by Michael Doyle from three standpoints. First, it questions whether the statistical tests (which were performed and published by scholars other than Doyle) actually test any coherent theory of peace or conflict. Second, it questions whether the data sets used are valid proxies for the variables they are meant to represent. Third it questions the methods used and the results obtained. The article argues that there may a lower… 

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