The Ingelfinger rule, embargoes, and journal peer review-part 1

@article{Altman1996TheIR,
  title={The Ingelfinger rule, embargoes, and journal peer review-part 1},
  author={Lawrence K. Altman},
  journal={The Lancet},
  year={1996},
  volume={347},
  pages={1382-1386}
}
  • L. Altman
  • Published 18 May 1996
  • Medicine
  • The Lancet

Ingelfinger, Embargoes, and Other Controls on the Dissemination of Science News

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  • Medicine
    American journal of infection control
  • 1998

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Peer review of manuscripts has recently become a subject of academic research and ethical debate. Critics of the review process argue that it is a means by which powerful members of the scientific

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Should Biomedical Publishing Be “Opened Up”? Toward a Values-Based Peer-Review Process

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A New JAMA Feature for Resident Physicians: A Call for Applications

This advance information and the news embargo are intended to provide journalists from various competitive news media equal access to news sources and an equal amount of time to prepare their news stories.

Viewpoint: Biomedicine's Electronic Publishing Paradigm Shift: Copyright Policy and PubMed Central

This report examines how the single act of permitting authors to retain copyright of their scholarly manuscripts may preserve the quality-control function of the current journal system while allowing PubMed Central, the Internet archiving system recently proposed by the director of the National Institutes of Health, to simplify and liberate access to the world's biomedical literature.
...

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