The Ingelfinger rule, embargoes, and journal peer review-part 1

@article{Altman1996TheIR,
  title={The Ingelfinger rule, embargoes, and journal peer review-part 1},
  author={Lawrence K. Altman},
  journal={The Lancet},
  year={1996},
  volume={347},
  pages={1382-1386}
}
  • L. Altman
  • Published 18 May 1996
  • Medicine, Political Science
  • The Lancet
It is 27 years since Dr Franz Ingelfinger announced that a manuscript would be rejected by his journal, the New England Journal of Medicine, if it had been published elsewhere. Many other medical journals have since adopted this so-called Ingelfinger rule. The restrictions resulting from the rule have generated enormous controversy in medical journalism, as shown by the first of the two-part article The Ingelfinger rule, embargoes, and journal peer review. Critics say that the rule restricts… 
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