The Information Systems Identity Crisis: Focusing on High-Visibility and High-Impact Research

@article{Agarwal2005TheIS,
  title={The Information Systems Identity Crisis: Focusing on High-Visibility and High-Impact Research},
  author={Ritu Agarwal and Henry C. Lucas},
  journal={MIS Q.},
  year={2005},
  volume={29},
  pages={381-398}
}
This paper presents an alternative view of the Information Systems identity crisis described recently by Benbasat and Zmud (2003. [] Key Result Our conclusion is that following Benbasat and Zmud's nomological net will result in a micro focus for IS research. The results of such a focus are potentially dangerous for the field. They could result in the elimination of IS from many academic programs. We present an alternative set of heuristics that can be used to assess what lies within the domain of IS scholar…
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TLDR
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