The Influence of Screening for Precancerous Lesions on Family-Based Genetic Association Tests: An Example of Colorectal Polyps and Cancer.

@article{Schmit2015TheIO,
  title={The Influence of Screening for Precancerous Lesions on Family-Based Genetic Association Tests: An Example of Colorectal Polyps and Cancer.},
  author={Stephanie L. Schmit and Jane C. Figueiredo and Victoria K Cortessis and Duncan C. Thomas},
  journal={American journal of epidemiology},
  year={2015},
  volume={182 8},
  pages={
          714-22
        }
}
Unintended consequences of secondary prevention include potential introduction of bias into epidemiologic studies estimating genotype-disease associations. To better understand such bias, we simulated a family-based study of colorectal cancer (CRC), which can be prevented by resecting screen-detected polyps. We simulated genes related to CRC development through risk of polyps (G1), risk of CRC but not polyps (G2), and progression from polyp to CRC (G3). Then, we examined 4 analytical strategies… 
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