• Corpus ID: 134286948

The Influence of Plant-Soil Interactions on Plant and Soil Microbial Responses to Nitrogen Deposition

@inproceedings{Potter2018TheIO,
  title={The Influence of Plant-Soil Interactions on Plant and Soil Microbial Responses to Nitrogen Deposition},
  author={Teal S. Potter},
  year={2018}
}
A common response of plant communities to increased nitrogen (N) deposition is a shift in species’ abundances. Multiple factors have been proposed to explain the changes in abundance, notably competition and soil acidification. We hypothesized that a plant species that decreased in abundance with elevated N would have lower ectomycorrhizal fungi, altered root-associated bacteria communities, and/or greater susceptibility to Al toxicity than a species that increased in abundance with increasing… 
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