The Imposter Phenomenon in High Achieving Women: Dynamics and Therapeutic Intervention

@inproceedings{Clance1978TheIP,
  title={The Imposter Phenomenon in High Achieving Women: Dynamics and Therapeutic Intervention},
  author={Pauline Rose Clance and Suzanne Ament Imes},
  year={1978}
}
  • Pauline Rose Clance, Suzanne Ament Imes
  • Published 1978
  • Psychology
  • The term impostor phenomenon is used to designate an int ernal experience of intellectual phonies, which appears to be particularly prevalent and intense among a select sample of high achieving women. Certain early family dynamics and later introjection of societal sex-role stereotyping appear to contribute significantly to the development of the impostor phenomenon. Despite outstanding academic and professional accomplishments, women who experience the imposter phenomenon persists in believing… CONTINUE READING

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