The Importance of Oligosulfides in the Attraction of Fly Pollinators to the Brood-Site Deceptive Species Jaborosa rotacea (Solanaceae)

@article{Mor2013TheIO,
  title={The Importance of Oligosulfides in the Attraction of Fly Pollinators to the Brood-Site Deceptive Species Jaborosa rotacea (Solanaceae)},
  author={Marcela Mor{\'e} and Andrea Ar{\'i}stides Cocucci and Robert A. Raguso},
  journal={International Journal of Plant Sciences},
  year={2013},
  volume={174},
  pages={863 - 876}
}
Premise of research. Brood-site deceptive flowers use dishonest signals—especially floral odors that mimic oviposition substrates—to attract and deceive saprophilous insects to pollinate them. In this work, we recorded the pollinators of the sapromyiophilous species Jaborosa rotacea (Solanaceae) endemic to southern South America. Then, we characterized the floral volatiles of this species, and finally, we carried out field experiments to decouple the effects of scent and color as attractants… Expand
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