The Importance of Handwriting Experience on the Development of the Literate Brain

@article{James2017TheIO,
  title={The Importance of Handwriting Experience on the Development of the Literate Brain},
  author={Karin Harman James},
  journal={Current Directions in Psychological Science},
  year={2017},
  volume={26},
  pages={502 - 508}
}
  • K. James
  • Published 8 November 2017
  • Psychology
  • Current Directions in Psychological Science
Handwriting experience can have significant effects on the ability of young children to recognize letters. Why handwriting has this facilitative effect and how this is accomplished were explored in a series of studies using overt behavioral measures and functional neuroimaging of the brain in 4- to 5-year-old children. My colleagues and I showed that early handwriting practice affects visual symbol recognition because it results in the production of variable visual forms that aid in symbol… 

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