The Importance of Dietary Carbohydrate in Human Evolution

@article{Hardy2015TheIO,
  title={The Importance of Dietary Carbohydrate in Human Evolution},
  author={Karen Hardy and Jennie C. Brand-Miller and K D Brown and Mark George Thomas and Les Copeland},
  journal={The Quarterly Review of Biology},
  year={2015},
  volume={90},
  pages={251 - 268}
}
We propose that plant foods containing high quantities of starch were essential for the evolution of the human phenotype during the Pleistocene. Although previous studies have highlighted a stone tool-mediated shift from primarily plant-based to primarily meat-based diets as critical in the development of the brain and other human traits, we argue that digestible carbohydrates were also necessary to accommodate the increased metabolic demands of a growing brain. Furthermore, we acknowledge the… 
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