The Imperial Conference and the Constitution

@article{JenksTheIC,
  title={The Imperial Conference and the Constitution},
  author={Edward W. Jenks},
  journal={The Cambridge Law Journal},
  volume={3},
  pages={13 - 23}
}
  • Edward W. Jenks
  • Published 1 November 1927
  • History, Economics
  • The Cambridge Law Journal
I Would like to preface what I have to say this evening by one deprecatory remark. I should not venture to tax your patience or reveal my own ignorance by attempting to speak of the Imperial Conference of 1926 as a whole. It was, probably, the most important of the striking series of Colonial and Imperial Conferences which have been held; and it covered an enormous area. It may be that the aspect of it with which alone I propose to deal is not the most important side of its many-sided labours… 

Constitutional law and empire in interwar Britain: universities, liberty, nationality and parliamentary supremacy

This article examines the influence of imperial law, law outside the UK but within the British Empire, on the development of British constitutional law in the interwar period. It first looks at