• Corpus ID: 151374686

The Impact of Internet Social Networking on Young Women’s Mood and Body Image Satisfaction: An Experimental Design

@inproceedings{Drames2016TheIO,
  title={The Impact of Internet Social Networking on Young Women’s Mood and Body Image Satisfaction: An Experimental Design},
  author={Tara Scirrott o Drames},
  year={2016}
}
In the present study, the impact of viewing various types of female images online was examined to approximate the potential impact of online photo viewing on socialnetworking sites. Two-hundred forty-one young women between the ages of 18 and 30 years were recruited on social-networking sites to participate. In this randomizedcontrolled, Internet-based study, participants were randomly assigned to one of the following groups of roughly 50 participants each: (a) very attractive-thin, (b) very… 

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