The Impact of Health on Job Mobility: A Measure of Job Lock

@article{Kapur1998TheIO,
  title={The Impact of Health on Job Mobility: A Measure of Job Lock},
  author={Kanika Kapur},
  journal={Industrial \& Labor Relations Review},
  year={1998},
  volume={51},
  pages={282 - 298}
}
  • K. Kapur
  • Published 1 January 1998
  • Business
  • Industrial & Labor Relations Review
The author analyzes data from the National Medical Expenditure Survey of 1987 to measure the importance of “job lock”—the reduction in job mobility due to the non-portability of employer-provided health insurance. Refining the approach commonly used by other researchers investigating the same question, the author finds insignificant estimates of job lock; moreover, the confidence intervals of these estimates exclude large levels of job lock. A replication of an influential previous study that… 

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