The Impact of Conservation on the Status of the World’s Vertebrates

@article{Hoffmann2010TheIO,
  title={The Impact of Conservation on the Status of the World’s Vertebrates},
  author={Michael Hoffmann and Craig Hilton‐Taylor and Ariadne Angulo and Monika B{\"o}hm and Thomas M. Brooks and Stuart H. M. Butchart and Kent E. Carpenter and Janice S. Chanson and Ben Collen and Neil A Cox and William Darwall and Nicholas K. Dulvy and Lucy R. Harrison and Vineet Katariya and Caroline M. Pollock and Suhel Quader and Nadia I. Richman and Ana S. L. Rodrigues and Marcelo F. Tognelli and J. Christophe Vi{\'e} and John M. Aguiar and David J. Allen and Gerald R. Allen and Giovanni Amori and Natalia Borisovna Ananjeva and Franco Andreone and Paul Andrew and Aida Ortiz and J. E. M. Baillie and Ricardo Baldi and Ben D. Bell and S. D. Biju and Jeremy P. Bird and Patricia Black-D{\'e}cima and Julian Blanc and Federico Bola{\~n}os and Wilmar Bol{\'i}var-G. and Ian J. Burfield and James A. Burton and David R. Capper and Fernando Castro and Gianluca Catullo and Rachel D. Cavanagh and Alan Channing and Ning Labbish Chao and Anna M. Chenery and Federica Chiozza and Viola Clausnitzer and Nigel J. Collar and Leah Collett and Bruce B. Collette and C. Fern{\'a}ndez and Matthew T. Craig and Michael J. Crosby and Neil Cumberlidge and Annabelle Cuttelod and Andrew E. Derocher and Arvin C. Diesmos and John Donaldson and John W. Duckworth and Guy Dutson and Sushil K Dutta and Richard Emslie and Aljos Farjon and Sarah L. Fowler and J{\"o}rg Freyhof and David L. Garshelis and Justin Gerlach and David J. Gower and Tandora D Grant and Geoffrey A. Hammerson and Richard B. Harris and Lawrence R Heaney and Simon Hedges and Jean-Marc Hero and Baz Hughes and Syed Ainul Hussain and Javier Icochea M and Robert F. Inger and Nobuo Ishii and Djoko T. Iskandar and Richard K. B. Jenkins and Yoshio Kaneko and Maurice Kottelat and Kit M. Kovacs and Sergius L. Kuzmin and Enrique La Marca and John F. Lamoreux and Michael Wai Neng Lau and Esteban Orlando Lavilla and Kristin Leus and Rebecca L. Lewison and Gabriela Lichtenstein and Suzanne Rachel Livingstone and Vimoksalehi Lukoschek and David P. Mallon and Philip J. K. McGowan and Anna L. McIvor and Patricia D. Moehlman and Sanjay Molur and Antonio Mu{\~n}oz Alonso and John A. Musick and Kristin Nowell and Ronald A. Nussbaum and Wanda Olech and Nikolay L. Orlov and Theodore J. Papenfuss and Gabriela Parra‐Olea and William Perrin and Beth A. Polidoro and Mohammad Hossien Pourkazemi and Paul A. Racey and Jim Ragle and Mala Ram and Galen B. Rathbun and Robert P. Reynolds and Anders G. J. Rhodin and Stephen John Richards and Lily O. Rodr{\'i}guez and Santiago R. Ron and Carlo Rondinini and Anthony B. Rylands and Yvonne J. Sadovy de Mitcheson and Jonnell C. Sanciangco and Kate L. Sanders and Georgina Santos-Barrera and Jan Schipper and Caryn Self-Sullivan and Yichuan Shi and Alan H. Shoemaker and Frederick T. Short and Claudio Sillero-Zubiri and D{\'e}bora Leite Silvano and Kevin G. Smith and Andrew T. Smith and Jos Snoeks and Alison J. Stattersfield and Andy Symes and Andrew B. Taber and Bibhab Kumar Talukdar and Helen J. Temple and Robert J. Timmins and Joseph Andrew Tobias and Katerina Tsytsulina and Denis Tweddle and Carmen A. {\'U}beda and Sarah Valenti and Peter Paul van Dijk and L. M. Wallace R.B. Martinez J. Veiga and Alberto V. Veloso and David C. Wege and Mark Wilkinson and Elizabeth A. Williamson and Feng Xie and Bruce E. Young and H. Reşit Akçakaya and Leon A. Bennun and Tim M. Blackburn and Luigi Boitani and Holly T. Dublin and Gustavo A B da Fonseca and Claude Gascon and Thomas E. Lacher and Georgina M. Mace and Sue A. Mainka and Jeffery A. McNeely and Russell A. Mittermeier and Gordon Mcgregor Reid and Jon Paul Rodr{\'i}guez and Andrew A. Rosenberg and Michael John Samways and Jane Smart and Bruce A. Stein and Simon N. Stuart},
  journal={Science},
  year={2010},
  volume={330},
  pages={1503 - 1509}
}
Assessing Biodiversity Declines Understanding human impact on biodiversity depends on sound quantitative projection. Pereira et al. (p. 1496, published online 26 October) review quantitative scenarios that have been developed for four main areas of concern: species extinctions, species abundances and community structure, habitat loss and degradation, and shifts in the distribution of species and biomes. Declines in biodiversity are projected for the whole of the 21st century in all scenarios… 
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