The ICRC and the detainees in Nazi concentration camps (1942–1945)

@article{Farr2012TheIA,
  title={The ICRC and the detainees in Nazi concentration camps (1942–1945)},
  author={S{\'e}bastien Farr{\'e}},
  journal={International Review of the Red Cross},
  year={2012},
  volume={94},
  pages={1381 - 1408}
}
  • Sébastien Farré
  • Published 1 December 2012
  • Political Science
  • International Review of the Red Cross
Abstract A sharp debate has emerged about the importance of humanitarian organisations speaking out against misdeeds and, more generally, on the ethical and moral aspects of doing humanitarian work in the face of mass violence. That debate has pushed out of the spotlight a number of essential questions regarding the work of the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) during the Second World War. The aim of this text is to scrutinize the ICRC's humanitarian operations for detainees of… 

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