The Hybrid Origin of “Modern” Humans

@article{Ackermann2015TheHO,
  title={The Hybrid Origin of “Modern” Humans},
  author={Rebecca Rogers Ackermann and Alex Mackay and Michael Lynn Arnold},
  journal={Evolutionary Biology},
  year={2015},
  volume={43},
  pages={1-11}
}
Recent genomic research has shown that hybridization between substantially diverged lineages is the rule, not the exception, in human evolution. However, the importance of hybridization in shaping the genotype and phenotype of Homo sapiens remains debated. Here we argue that current evidence for hybridization in human evolution suggests not only that it was important, but that it was an essential creative force in the emergence of our variable, adaptable species. We then extend this argument to… 
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