The Human Genome Project: Lessons from Large-Scale Biology

@article{Collins2003TheHG,
  title={The Human Genome Project: Lessons from Large-Scale Biology},
  author={Francis S. Collins and Michael J. Morgan and Aristides Patrinos},
  journal={Science},
  year={2003},
  volume={300},
  pages={286 - 290}
}
The Human Genome Project has been the first major foray of the biological and medical research communities into “big science.” In this Viewpoint, we present some of our experiences in organizing and managing such a complicated, publicly funded, international effort. We believe that many of the lessons we learned will be applicable to future large-scale projects in biology. 
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