The Histology of Kidney Transplant Failure: A Long-Term Follow-Up Study

@article{Naesens2014TheHO,
  title={The Histology of Kidney Transplant Failure: A Long-Term Follow-Up Study},
  author={Maarten Naesens and Dirk R J Kuypers and Katrien de Vusser and Pieter Evenepoel and Kathleen J Claes and Bert Bammens and Bj{\"o}rn K Meijers and Ben Sprangers and Jacques Pirenne and Diethard Monbaliu and Ina Jochmans and Evelyne Lerut},
  journal={Transplantation},
  year={2014},
  volume={98},
  pages={427–435}
}
Background The relative impact on renal allograft outcome of specific histological diagnoses versus nonspecific chronic histological damage remains unclear. Methods All 1,197 renal allograft recipients who were transplanted at a single center between 1991 and 2001 were included. All posttransplant renal allograft indication biopsies performed in this cohort during follow-up (mean, 14.5±2.80 years after transplantation) were rescored according to the current histological criteria and associated… 
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The frequency of acute/active rejections was low and that of chronic changes higher, in keeping with delayed biopsies, and mixed lesions were the predominant findings, followed by others (mostly CNI toxicity and IFTA categories.
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A single-center cohort study in 1000 renal allograft recipients, transplanted between March 2004 and February 2013, provides better insight in the eventual causes of graft failure and their relative contribution, highlighting the weight of nonimmune causes.
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The causes and frequency of kidney allograft failure in a low-resource setting: observational data from Iraqi Kurdistan
TLDR
Kurdish transplant patients had graft failure rates similar to living donors reported by the USRDS for the year 2000 but higher than reported for 2010, and Kurdistan patients had a moderate excess of HD failures at one and 5 years post-engraftment.
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CD45, VIM and POSTN correlate to each-other and predict graft outcome, while 25(OH)VitD might influence inflammation and fibrosis in KTx.
Pretransplant Donor-Specific Anti-HLA Antibodies and the Risk for Rejection-Related Graft Failure of Kidney Allografts
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Pretransplant DSAs are a risk factor for early graft loss and increase the incidence for humoral rejection and graft loss but do not affect the risk for T cell-mediated rejection.
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