The High Cost of Science Journals: A Case Study and Discussion

@article{RoseWiles2011TheHC,
  title={The High Cost of Science Journals: A Case Study and Discussion},
  author={Lisa M. Rose-Wiles},
  journal={Journal of Electronic Resources Librarianship},
  year={2011},
  volume={23},
  pages={219 - 241}
}
  • Lisa M. Rose-Wiles
  • Published 1 July 2011
  • Education
  • Journal of Electronic Resources Librarianship
Like many libraries, Seton Hall University Libraries has suffered budget cuts that forced a reduction in serial subscriptions. As science librarian, I report on my efforts to streamline subscriptions and to address the question “Why are science journals so expensive?” Our science journals are significantly more expensive than journals in other areas. Our commercially published science journals are 25% more expensive than those from non-profit publishers, although the difference is not… 
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A granular, step-by-step calculation of the costs associated with publishing primary research articles, from submission, through peer- review, to publication, indexing and archiving, finds that these costs range from less than US$200 per article in modern, large scale publishing platforms using post-publication peer-review, to about US$1,000 per articles in prestigious journals with rejection rates exceeding 90%.
Current market rates for scholarly publishing services.
TLDR
A granular, step-by-step calculation of the costs associated with publishing primary research articles, from submission, through peer- review, to publication, indexing and archiving, finds that these costs range from less than US$200 per article in modern, large-scale publishing platforms using post-publication peer-review, to about US$1,000 per articles in prestigious journals with rejection rates exceeding 90%.
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For decades, the supra-inflation increase of subscription prices for scholarly journals has concerned scholarly institutions. After years of fruitless efforts to solve this “serials crisis”, open
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Using price quotes and invoices for thousands of full-text databases and single-journal subscriptions, this study confirms that for a typical master’s university, the journals acquired through
Current market rates for scholarly publishing services [ version 2 ; peer review : 2 approved ]
For decades, the supra-inflation increase of subscription prices for scholarly journals has concerned scholarly institutions. After years of fruitless efforts to solve this “serials crisis”, open
The pricing of open access journals: Diverse niches and sources of value in academic publishing
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Analyzes the Directory of Open Access Journals to identify characteristics of OA academic journals related to the adoption of article processing charge (APC)-based business models, as well as the price points of journals that charge APCs.
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This article investigates the possibility that e-journal collections can reach a maximum size that satisfies long-term patron needs without further significant expansion. The study included
Are Print Books Dead? An Investigation of Book Circulation at a Mid-Sized Academic Library
TLDR
Circulation of print books at Seton Hall University Libraries is analyzed using the WorldCat Analysis tool and Voyager data to inform collection development and prompted a comprehensive weeding project, participation in an international scholarly reading study, and an e-book, patron-driven acquisition program.
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