• Corpus ID: 152595378

The Hidden Cost of Being African American: How Wealth Perpetuates Inequality

@inproceedings{Shapiro2004TheHC,
  title={The Hidden Cost of Being African American: How Wealth Perpetuates Inequality},
  author={Thomas M. Shapiro},
  year={2004}
}
Over the past three decades, racial prejudice in America has declined significantly and many African American families have seen a steady rise in employment and annual income. But alongside these encouraging signs, Thomas Shapiro argues in The Hidden Cost of Being African American, fundamental levels of racial inequality persist, particularly in the area of asset accumulation--inheritance, savings accounts, stocks, bonds, home equity, and other investments-. Shapiro reveals how the lack of… 

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