The Herding Hormone

@article{Stallen2012TheHH,
  title={The Herding Hormone},
  author={Mirre Stallen and C. D. De Dreu and Shaul Shalvi and Ale Smidts and Alan G. Sanfey},
  journal={Psychological Science},
  year={2012},
  volume={23},
  pages={1288 - 1292}
}
People often conform to others with whom they associate. Surprisingly, however, little is known about the possible hormonal mechanisms that may underlie in-group conformity. Here, we examined whether conformity toward one’s in-group is altered by oxytocin, a neuropeptide often implicated in social behavior. After administration of either oxytocin or a placebo, participants were asked to provide attractiveness ratings of unfamiliar visual stimuli. While viewing each stimulus, participants were… Expand

Figures and Topics from this paper

Oxytocin enhances implicit social conformity to both in-group and out-group opinions
TLDR
Results showed that oxytocin promotes conformity to opinions of both in- and out-group members when social pressure is implicit, suggesting that it facilitates 'tend and befriend' behaviors by increasing the general level of social conformity. Expand
Oxytocin promotes attention to social cues regardless of group membership
TLDR
Findings support that OT works by a simple illumination of social cues that seem to be processed regardless of social identity aspects at early stages of attention. Expand
Peer influence: neural mechanisms underlying in-group conformity
TLDR
The data suggest that conformity to the in-group is mediated by both positive affect as well as the cognitive capacity of perspective taking, which may provide an integral step in developing more effective campaigns using group conformity as a tool for behavioral change. Expand
Oxytocin Facilitates Social Learning by Promoting Conformity to Trusted Individuals
TLDR
It is proposed that a key role for oxytocin is not in facilitating social trust per se but in conforming to, and learning from, trusted individuals who are either in-group members and/or perceived experts. Expand
Effects of Oxytocin on Social Comparisons in Intergroup Situations
TLDR
It is demonstrated that OXT facilitates intergroup social comparisons with out-group versus in-group members and, if so, how this modulation manifests is examined. Expand
The Social Salience Hypothesis of Oxytocin
TLDR
A theoretical framework is suggested that focuses on the overarching role of oxytocin in regulating the salience of social cues through its interaction with the dopaminergic system and is dependent on baseline individual differences such as gender, personality traits, and degree of psychopathology. Expand
Oxytocin differentially modulates compromise and competitive approach but not withdrawal to antagonists from own vs. rivaling other groups
TLDR
It is concluded that oxytocin sensitizes humans to the group membership of their interaction partner, rendering them relatively more benevolent and less competitive towards those seen as belonging to their own group. Expand
Sex- and Context-dependent Effects of Oxytocin on Social Reward Processing
TLDR
It is demonstrated that OXT facilitates the impact of sharing positive experiences with others in women, but not men, and that this is associated with differential effects on the amygdala and insula and their functional connections. Expand
Oxytocin and Social Cognition.
  • A. Ebert, M. Brüne
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Current topics in behavioral neurosciences
  • 2018
TLDR
Oxytocin is an important modulator of social cognitive processes, although substantially more research is needed in order to understand the complexity of oxytocinergic effects on social perception, cognition, and interpersonal behavior. Expand
Oxytocin Effect on Collective Decision Making: A Randomized Placebo Controlled Study
TLDR
Experimental time dependent analysis and trial-by-trial analysis showed that under oxytocin the more competent member of each dyad was less likely to change his mind during disagreements, while the less competent member showed a greater willingness to changed his mind and conform to the opinion of his more reliable partner. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 34 REFERENCES
Intranasal Administration of Oxytocin Increases Envy and Schadenfreude (Gloating)
TLDR
The results suggest that the oxytocinergic system is involved in modulating envy and gloating, contrary to the prevailing belief that this system is involvement solely in positive prosocial behaviors, it probably plays a key role in a wider range of social emotion-related behaviors. Expand
Oxytocin Increases Generosity in Humans
TLDR
Oxytocin and altruism together predicted almost half the interpersonal variation in generosity, indicating that generosity is associated with both altruism as well as an emotional identification with another person. Expand
Social effects of oxytocin in humans: context and person matter
TLDR
It is proposed that this literature can be informed by an interactionist approach in which the effects of oxytocin are constrained by features of situations and/or individuals. Expand
Oxytocin promotes human ethnocentrism
TLDR
Findings call into question the view of oxytocin as an indiscriminate “love drug” or “cuddle chemical” and suggest that Oxytocin has a role in the emergence of intergroup conflict and violence. Expand
Oxytocin increases trust in humans
TLDR
It is shown that intranasal administration of oxytocin, a neuropeptide that plays a key role in social attachment and affiliation in non-human mammals, causes a substantial increase in trust among humans, thereby greatly increasing the benefits from social interactions. Expand
Oxytocin and cooperation under conditions of uncertainty: The modulating role of incentives and social information
TLDR
Investigating how OT interacts with two well-studied determinants of cooperative behavior: incentives and social information found social information appears to be crucial for OT to boost cooperative expectations in an interdependent social interaction that provides incentives to cooperate. Expand
Reinforcement Learning Signal Predicts Social Conformity
TLDR
Functional magnetic resonance imaging is shown to show that conformity is based on mechanisms that comply with principles of reinforcement learning, and it is found that individual judgments of facial attractiveness are adjusted in line with group opinion. Expand
Oxytocin Shapes the Neural Circuitry of Trust and Trust Adaptation in Humans
TLDR
It is found that subjects in the oxytocin group show no change in their trusting behavior after they learned that their trust had been breached several times while subjects receiving placebo decrease their trust. Expand
Social categorization and intergroup behaviour
The aim of the studies was to assess the effefcs of social categorization on intergroup behaviour when, in the intergroup situation, neither calculations of individual interest nor previouslyExpand
The Role of Oxytocin in Human Affect
Social behavior is crucial for day-to-day activities, and oxytocin has emerged as playing a central regulatory role. Oxytocin increases positive social emotions such as trust and altruism, leading toExpand
...
1
2
3
4
...