The Health Care Experiments at Many Farms: The Navajo, Tuberculosis, and the Limits of Modern Medicine, 1952-1962

@article{Jones2002TheHC,
  title={The Health Care Experiments at Many Farms: The Navajo, Tuberculosis, and the Limits of Modern Medicine, 1952-1962},
  author={David S Jones},
  journal={Bulletin of the History of Medicine},
  year={2002},
  volume={76},
  pages={749 - 790}
}
  • David S Jones
  • Published 21 November 2002
  • Medicine
  • Bulletin of the History of Medicine
In January 1952 a team of medical researchers from Cornell Medical College learned that tuberculosis raged untreated on the Navajo Reservation in Arizona. These researchers, led by Walsh McDermott, recognized a valuable opportunity for medical research, and they began a ten-year project to evaluate the efficacy of new antibiotics and test the power of modern medicine to improve the health conditions of an impoverished rural society. The history of this endeavor exposes a series of tensions at… Expand
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