The Health Benefits of Writing about Life Goals

@article{King2001TheHB,
  title={The Health Benefits of Writing about Life Goals},
  author={Laura A. King},
  journal={Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin},
  year={2001},
  volume={27},
  pages={798 - 807}
}
  • L. King
  • Published 1 July 2001
  • Psychology
  • Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
In a variation on Pennebaker’s writing paradigm, a sample of 81 undergraduates wrote about one of four topics for 20 minutes each day for 4 consecutive days. Participants were randomly assigned to write about their most traumatic life event, their best possible future self, both of these topics, or a nonemotional control topic. Mood was measured before and after writing and health center data for illness were obtained with participant consent. Three weeks later, measures of subjective well… 

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