The Head and Neck Muscles of the Serval and Tiger: Homologies, Evolution, and Proposal of a Mammalian and a Veterinary Muscle Ontology

@article{Diogo2012TheHA,
  title={The Head and Neck Muscles of the Serval and Tiger: Homologies, Evolution, and Proposal of a Mammalian and a Veterinary Muscle Ontology},
  author={R. Diogo and Francisco Pastor and F. D. de Paz and J. Potau and G. Bello-Hellegouarch and E. Ferrero and R. E. Fisher},
  journal={The Anatomical Record: Advances in Integrative Anatomy and Evolutionary Biology},
  year={2012},
  volume={295}
}
Here we describe the head and neck muscles of members of the two extant felid subfamilies (Leptailurus serval: Felinae; Panthera tigris: Pantherinae) and compare these muscles with those of other felids, other carnivorans (e.g., domestic dogs), other eutherian mammals (e.g., rats, tree-shrews and modern humans), and noneutherian mammals including monotremes. [...] Key Result Our observations and comparisons and the specific use of this nomenclature point out that felids such as tigers and servals and other…Expand
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