The Gregorian Mission and English Education

@article{Jones1928TheGM,
  title={The Gregorian Mission and English Education},
  author={Putnam Fennell Jones},
  journal={Speculum},
  year={1928},
  volume={3},
  pages={335 - 348}
}
  • P. F. Jones
  • Published 1 July 1928
  • History, Education
  • Speculum
B EDE asserts that in the year 631 King Sigebert of East Anglia 'founded a school wherein boys should be taught letters,' and which was furnished with 'masters and teachers after the manner of the people of Kent.' 1 On this passage Leach bases his contention that, if Canterbury had a school which was a model in 631, it must have been established by St Augustine as an adjunct to the Cathedral of Christ Church in 598; 2 that the school there founded was a grammar school, modelled, not upon the… 

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