• Corpus ID: 234469741

The Greedy and Recursive Search for Morphological Productivity

@article{Belth2021TheGA,
  title={The Greedy and Recursive Search for Morphological Productivity},
  author={Caleb Belth and Sarah Payne and Deniz Beser and Jordan Kodner and Charles D. Yang},
  journal={ArXiv},
  year={2021},
  volume={abs/2105.05790}
}
As children acquire the knowledge of their language’s morphology, they invariably discover the productive processes that can generalize to new words. Morphological learning is made challenging by the fact that even fully productive rules have exceptions, as in the well-known case of English past tense verbs, which features the -ed rule against the irregular verbs. The Tolerance Principle is a recent proposal that provides a precise threshold of exceptions that a productive rule can withstand… 

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